London Calling


Catherine Yass: Dream Shifts

The young British photographer and filmmaker Catherine Yass has been nominated for the Turner Prize 2002. The artist’s work has already been represented for several years in the collection of the Deutsche Bank; her famous light boxes are hanging in Winchester House, the bank’s British headquarters. A portrait of the artist by Alistair Hicks.



The Human Clay

London is also the capital of painting: in 1976, the artist R.B. Kitaj coined the term “The School of London” to designate the artists of the group exhibition “The Human Clay.” Among these were painters such as Frank Auerbach, Francis Bacon, Peter Blake, Lucian Freud, and Richard Hamilton – a generation of artists who helped shape painting history, making London into an art metropolis on equal footing with New York.


Six Photographers: A View from London

The art critic Andrew Lambirth has had a look around the London collection of the Deutsche Bank and is introducing us to six of its most important photographers: Johnnie Shand Kydd, Hannah Collins, Anya Gallaccio, David Hiscock, and Maik and Dirk Löbbert.


Susan Derges: "The whole night became my dark room ..."

Susan Derges photographs without a camera, using the powers of moonlight and water for her images. Its strong presence in the London collection proves just how current young British photographic art is. A portrait of the artist by Alistair Hicks.



London Calling


In Great Britain, it’s an event that’s almost as popular as the “Brit Awards” for the national music industry: millions of television viewers will be tuning in when the Turner Prize is awarded on December 8, broadcast live from the Tate Britain in London. Among those nominated are the young British artist Catherine Yass. The artist’s work has already been represented for several years in the collection of the Deutsche Bank: more than enough reason to take a closer look at the rest of the art in London’s Winchester House. Along with Catherine Yass, we’re reporting on Susan Derges, who uses a river and moonlight to develop her photograms. Alistair Hicks paid Derges a visit in Devon, while Andrew Lambirth had a look around the London collection; he’s selected six examples that illustrate just how divergent the positions of young photography can be. Yet London is also the capital of painting; the 1976 group show “The Human Clay” was partly responsible for creating this reputation. Now, an entire floor of Winchester House is dedicated to this exhibition. We’re introducing the generation of painters known as “School of London,” a term the artist R.B. Kitaj first coined for the show. Finally, in the section “Art at Work,” you can read an interview with the London gallery dealer Sadie Coles, whose program sets standards for the international art scene.