Jeff Koons: Interview

Next to Warhol, Jeff Koons is probably the epitome of the "American" artist: more than any of his contemporaries, Koons confronted the artistic currents of the 20th century with the commercial strategies of the advertising and entertainment industries. Cheryl Kaplan visited him in his New York studio.


A World Full of Multiples: Richard Prince

Rock stars, Marlboro cowboys, and tennis Lolitas - Richard Prince's images feature the icons of mass culture. The American artist appropriates their images through photographing and then manipulating them. Prince's cool eye analyzes the myths of the consumerist society - and the abysses behind them.


The Art of Shopping

Pop Art wasn' t the first movement to discover consumerist culture as a theme. Since the beginning of modernism, the product world's seductive gleam as it is staged in advertising's drama has posed a challenge to art. Achim Drucks describes how artists examine the temptations of the consumerist society.


Painting at a Rate of 150 Beats per Minute: Michel Majerus

Michel Majerus transferred the method of sampling from the techno scene to painting. In his works, visual codes of mass culture collide: logos, comics, digital images. Harald Fricke on the artist, who died in 2003 and whose Neo-Pop works are now being presented in several major retrospectives.


Consumerism

Shop till you drop! Tempting wares, advertising’s perfect stagings – consumerism influences our everyday lives and culture. Part of it all is juggling the visual codes of the commodity society, as can be seen in the works of Jeff Koons, Michel Majerus, and Richard Prince. Logos, slogans, and the flawless surfaces of advertising images provide artists with ample material for their work. At the same time, the large name brands are appropriating art to infuse their products with the aura of something special. The “children of Marx and Coca Cola” caught between fascination and subversive criticism – db artmag on art, shopping, the star cult, and the inflation of the commercial image. +++ Since the early eighties, Jeff Koons has been working with products and advertising motifs, such as in his series “Easyfun-Ethereal,” which was shown in 2000 at the Deutsche Guggenheim. Cheryl Kaplan met with the art star in New York. +++ Elegant and subversive, he sampled quotes from advertising, pop, culture, mangas, and art history in his paintings. Now he is being honored posthumously in several shows: Harald Fricke on the “image-generating machine” Michel Majerus +++ When products turn into fetishes: Achim Drucks introduces works from the Deutsche Bank Collection that investigate the world of consumerism and advertising. +++ Rock stars, Marlboro cowboys, and tennis Lolitas – Richard Prince’s works feature the icons of mass culture. Louise Gray embarks on a trip through the dark depths of the American artist. +++