this issue contains
>> Portrait Ursula Döbereiner / Kirstine Roepstorff
>> Lawrence Weiner: Interview
>> Cash Flow at the ibc in Frankfurt: Olaf Metzel

>> archive

 


Lawrence Weiner: Untitled, 2000
Deutsche Bank Collection, ©VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2005

How does disobedience function in your work?

Artists get paid to push things to the limit. It's a totally vibrant, rather than violent interaction, but it's violent in the sense that you're going to destroy other people's dreams and fantasies by presenting what you consider reality.

It's volatile.

Volatile is a good word. Then one day it isn't and it becomes art history



Lawrence Weiner: Untitled, 2000
Deutsche Bank Collection, ©VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2005

Alice Zimmerman wrote: "The two styles of the Propeller and Removal Paintings were bridged by ideas concerning conditions of ownership and that all paintings were sold for the same price regardless of size."

That was at that time. None of those paintings are around, so it's a moot point. The collectors that have them don't want to sell them. I don't have any.

Do those conditions of ownership still interest you?

It's a matter of responsibility. The paintings were done in conversation with people, to determine where we were going and how to build them. It was non-contractual. A painting would develop, and they'd pay me or trade me what they were trading. That's what I do nowadays.




Lawrence Weiner: OIL + WATER + WOOD,1993
Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery

It's a direct process of exchange.

If they accept responsibility, I accept responsibility and we place it into the world. It changes people's perceptions. Getting back to Aristotle, there's a problem - remember, he was involved in parallel universes and hierarchies. My work has always been involved in simultaneous realities. There cannot be a hierarchy between what I make and what somebody else makes, there has to be use value at the time.

I'm looking at the exchange between the person perceiving your work and what they take away.

They're using it and when they use it, the value becomes a necessity of the effects of a capitalist society. And we do live in a capitalist society. So did Aristotle. They had slaves, and thank heaven we don't.




Lawrence Weiner:
A BASIC ASSUMPTION
OUT OF HARMS WAY
A BIT TO THE SIDE
MORE TOWARDS THE LIGHT
RELEGATED TO THE SHADOWS
BROUGHT TO TOUCH
WITHIN THE SPERE
IN VIEW OF MOST
1999
Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery

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