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Your black horizon Art Pavilion
An art project by Olafur Eliasson and David Adjaye on Lopud Island



Your black horizon Art Pavilion caused a sensation when it was premiered at the last Biennale. Now the joint project by Olafur Eliasson and David Adjaye can be experienced on the Croatian island of Lopud. The light installation was opened with a symposium supported by Deutsche Bank and attended by a number of big names. The initiator of the project, Francesca von Habsburg, the artist and the architect of the pavilion discussed the potential of temporary art spaces with a panel of international experts.





Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Art Pavilion
in Lopud, Kroatien (Außenansicht)
Photo: Michael Strasser
© Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, 2007



A small path winds its way from the bay up a hill. Your black horizon Art Pavilion – a joint project by artist Olafur Eliasson and architect David Adjaye – sits hidden behind cypress trees, gnarled olive trees and old stone walls. From a distance, the construction brings to mind an oversized wooden fence. Behind it rises a tree-covered hill, and below it the ocean shimmers a rich blue. The pavilion sits amid an enchanted idyll on Lopud, a small island just off the coast from the Croatian port city of Dubrovnik.




Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Art Pavilion
in Lopud, Kroatien (Außenansicht)
Photo: Michael Strasser
© Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, 2007



Your black horizon Art Pavilion is a programmatic commissioned work for Francesca von Habsburg's foundation T-B A21, and was first shown at the 51st Venice Biennale. At the same time, it's the pilot project of an initiative that has developed a new approach to the presentation of contemporary art. A series of temporary pavilions is planned in which commissioned works are shown on a rotating basis, creating a continually regenerating network. "It is important to us at T-B A21 to promote the importance and value of contemporary art projects in 'remote' environments – places not as easily accessible as regional centers, communities with sparse and unlikely exposure to contemporary art", says Francesca von Habsburg, who has been involved in the arts in Croatia for some time.



David Adjaye, Francesca von Habsburg and Olafur Eliasson
Opening of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Art Pavilion,
Lopud, Kroatien, 2007
Photo: Todd Eberle / Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, 2007


On the occasion of the art pavilion's opening, Deutsche Bank supported a symposium called Patronage Over Space in Dubrovnik. It took place at the Lazareti, a former 17th-century quarantine station on the edge of the old city center that is currently used for various cultural activities. A panel made up of prominent experts discussed the relationships between art and architecture and the integration of innovative projects such as the art pavilion in local structures.



Symposium "Patronage of Space", Lopud, Kroatien, 2007
Christ Inman, Olafur Eliasson, Francesca von Habsburg,
Andreas Ruby, Jorge Otero-Pailos, David Adjaye, Matthew Ritchie
Photo: Mateo Rilovic/ Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, 2007


Along with initiator Francesca von Habsburg, Olafur Eliasson and David Adjaye, panel members included artist Matthew Ritchie, curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, architect Dinko Peracic and architectural conservationists and theorists such as Beatriz Colomina, Mark Wigley and Andreas Ruby.
Eliasson and Adjaye emphasized the close cooperation that went into their project, which they had developed in an artistic dialogue. Obrist, one of those responsible for the annual summer pavilion in London's Serpentine Gallery, stressed that pavilions interest him precisely because of their "limited life span". He said that as temporary constructions created especially for specific works, they were particularly closely connected with the art they house. For Andreas Ruby, pavilions possess the potential to establish new and closer relationships between viewers and artworks than ordinary museums can. He said it was especially important that they be open-plan and integrated into the on-site contexts. Then, such temporally limited projects had the potential to attract the public to unknown places off the beaten art-world paths, such as to Lopud.



Olafur Eliasson and David Adjaye
Opening Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Art Pavilion, Lopud, Kroatien, 2007
Photo: Mateo Rilovic / Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, 2007


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