this issue contains
>> Cai Guo-Qiang in New York / Bill's "Continuity" moves / Exhibitions supported by Deutsche Bank receive awards
>> Deutsche Bank's VIP Lounge at the TEFAF / New: The Deutsche Guggenheim Magazine

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TEFAF 2008:
Ellen Gallagher's Series DeLuxe in Deutsche Bank's VIP Lounge




Ellen Gallagher, from the series "DeLuxe", 2005,
Deutsche Bank Collection, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

This year, Deutsche Bank will once again co-sponsor the TEFAF in Maastricht with a VIP Lounge at the leading fair for art and antiquities worldwide. Already the 2007 motto commemorating the fair's 20th anniversary, "Simply the Best," was significant in this respect, because 2008 proves once again to be a year of superlatives. From March 7 to 16, 227 international galleries and art dealers will be showing works ranging from antiquity to the 21st century – everything from paintings, drawings, sculptures, furniture, book art, and textiles to porcelain, silver, and jewels. The estimated value of the exhibited specimens is well over a billion dollars, not including the precious gems of jewelers such as Graff, Bulgari, or Chopard. Along with the traditional sections offering artistic treasures from antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, or the paintings of Old Masters, the exhibition sections featuring Asian and contemporary art are growing increasingly important at the Dutch fair.




Ellen Gallagher, "DeLuxe", 2005,
Deutsche Bank Collection, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

Thus, in 2008 Deutsche Bank's VIP Lounge will be dedicated to a young masterpiece – Ellen Gallagher's 60-part series De Luxe (2004/2005), which was purchased in 2006 as one of the most important new acquisitions to the corporate collection. Along with Kara Walker, Gallagher counts among the most important African American artists of the present day. Her series DeLuxe is based on archival material from magazines like Ebony, a successful lifestyle magazine developed in 1945 specifically for the African American market. Gallagher's paintings and drawings are characterized by cunning interventions, for instance the googly eyes and wigs of plasticine that she embellishes the advertisements with. Her visual commentaries investigate the past while undermining the language and behavioral patterns the ads propagate. In using both authentic and invented historical material, Gallagher unmasks cultural "truths" as advertising promises, forcing the viewer to confront manipulated information. Her work addresses American identity and how this identity is first adapted and then smoothened out, even while the conflicts endure. The tension in the work derives from the subtle, but ruthless interplay between an austere minimalist formalism and the historically charged archival material. Gallagher’s references to jazz and Minimal Art generate entirely new visual experiences.



Ellen Gallagher, from the series "DeLuxe", 2005,
Deutsche Bank Collection, Courtesy Gagosian Gallery

At TEFAF, De Luxe will be shown in the exclusive VIP Lounge - a room environment recalling the atmosphere of a cinema or theater. In the lounge, painted in deep velvety red hues, the series will be dramatically lit and presented as though on a screen or stage, with the focus entirely on the presentation of this large-scale work. With the exhibition of DeLuxe, Deutsche Bank underscores its commitment to modern and contemporary art as well as its effort to illuminate current social themes against an art historical background.

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